Avoiding 3 Common Mistakes Even Savvy Decorators Make When Choosing Art

By Yohanna Jessup
November 15, 2012

In the realm of interior design, the works of art you choose should frame your decor and go beyond matching the furniture, being “cool,” or displaying status symbols.

Consider these tips for choosing art for your home.

Mistake No. 1 Choosing artwork to match the sofa

Find work that compliments your mood and the style of your décor. To that end, here are some important questions to consider.

  • Does the art make your energy feel light or heavy?Try experimenting. Grab a National Geographic or some other magazine with a wide variety of images and take a look through the pictures. Become aware of the photographs that weigh you down and those that create an effervescent effect in your energy. Once you learn to recognize these feelings, have a look at the pictures on your walls.Give away or donate the ones that weigh you down. Find others that bring you the greatest joy. Position them in locations with the greatest visual impact.
  • What do the images evoke?If you are single and want a relationship, surround yourself with images of pairs and lovers. If you want to increase prosperity, surround yourself with images that create a sense of wealth and abundance. If you are going through a career change, surround yourself with images that bring a sense of enthusiasm, success. Consider portraits of role models in your field.Surround yourself with images that are symbolic of who you are, who you want to be.
  • Why do you like the images that you like?Sometimes we choose images that inspire us and make our energy hum with delight. Other times we choose images that make us feel comfortable in a way that is not productive, but locks us into unconscious habits and self-limiting beliefs.Dullness does not inspire you to be the vibrant, exceptional. Become aware of why you are drawn to a particular image. Consciously choose images that will support you in becoming all you can be.

    Mistake No. 2: Choosing art that ‘looks cool’

    Art that looks cool or is created with interesting materials is a good place to begin. But you can have a deeper relationship with art.

    Take it a step further and find art that really resonates through you. The most powerful experiences from art come from finding work that speaks to your most primal essence.

    Do a little home work and then choose work that you love. Love love. Love that makes you feel all shivery, like that first high school crush. Love that lights you up on the inside so much that you glow on the outside. Love that fills you with a sense of wonder, inspiration, awe.

    What if every time you walked in your front door, you were met with an experience of love? What if being at home meant you were surrounded by love? How would that change in your life?

    Mistake No. 3: Choosing work by an artist to give yourself status

    For some who collect, art is an investment, but investing in art does not have to be empty and soul-less.

    Find artwork and artists that you love and whose work you joyfully want to support.

    If the artist is a living person, see if you can cultivate a relationship with them. It’s not hard to find personable artists. They are everywhere – high schools, colleges, nursing homes, local galleries, and at your fingertips on the amazing internet.

    The more you learn about a piece of art and the artist who created it, the more value you’ll find in the work. In the process of purchasing art, the experience of getting to know the artist becomes embodied in the piece.

    As an artist, I love talking to people who are interested in the art I create. Having a collector or client contact me and purchase a piece of work is the highest compliment.

    DeadlineNews.Com’s Spiritual Space Writer Yohanna Jessup is an international artist and creator of Painting Sacred Spaces. She’ll help you transform dull, lifeless spaces into beautiful personal spaces of passion, inspiration, self realization, vitality, clarity, and peace. Contact her at Yohanna Jessup.

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